Archive for January, 2012

Pram macgyvering

We picked up a 2nd hand phil and ted’s e3 v2, but the bearings were very loose which made the pram wander.  I googled the process for replacing the rear bearings but found nothing. So here’s the process I followed:
1. Remove hubcap and wheel. Pick out the quick release spring.
2. The star washer holds the axle on. Encourage the axle out by tapping the end with the hole (the end with more axle coming out) against a soft surface with gentle but firm taps. Get the star washer to the point that it’s just under the hole for the quick release nubbin.


3. Align the star washer so that there’s a gap directly over the hole, not a point. I used pliers and a screwdriver in the hole.


4. Sit the wheel on a pipe such that the axle passes through. Pop some dowel on top of the axle. The dowel should be just big enough to cover the axle. Gently apply a hammer.

5. Once the axle’s out, there are two bearings.  One’s recessed into the wheel, the other is flush with the surface.  Pop the surface one out with a screwdriver or similar.

6. The other bearing needs to be poked out.  I used the handle of an engine crane, but any suitable sized tube will do.  Poke it into the open end and apply force to poke the bearing out of its recessed home.

7. Clean up the interior of the wheel – I used a tissue.

8.Fit the surface bearing: thumbs will do.

9. A socket and mallet help seat the recessed bearing.

10. Refit the axle and pop the star washer on top.  A socket and mallet help to drive the star washer down.

11. The star washer snugly fitted back on the axle.

12. Refit the nubbin and reinsert the wheel into the pram.

Remember that if you embark on this, only you are responsible for the quality of your work.  If in doubt, take it into a bike shop or similar – they should be able to help.

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“Chef’s perks”

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Just heard this term via Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall and mustered the courage to taste my chicken livers fried on toast. I fried them in duck fat with thyme, and ate them with lots of pepper. They were delicious! I shouldn’t be surprised, but it’s the first time i’ve cooked liver.

January hatching

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We had a cool spell followed by a few real summer days and over this time the incubator couldn’t cope and soared to an egg-poaching 39.5 degrees celcius. Surprisingly, we still got 19 chicks out of our 4 dozen eggs: a surprise silver lining. Still, we’re hoping for a better result from the 18 eggs we put in today. We’ve split the chicks that lived across 2 tubs; these are the photogenic ones.

Garden highlights

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This season’s stars, other than beans, are olives, tomatoes, and sunflowers. The garlic has been struggling though and our basil is still stunted. Will try mulching the basil in case it’s a water thing but the garlic is a lost cause, sadly.

Summer evening eating

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One of the things I love about summer is coming home of an evening and rummaging in the garden for something for dinner. Tonight, carrots! And garlic.

Bean curtain update

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The beans are growing well now; many are taller than me! And aside from the shade we’re starting to get some beans too! They aren’t quite tall or bushy enough to produce meaningful shade yet but hopefully it won’t be long.

Finished box

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Both roosters have slept in the box for a few nights now. Their crowing is audible in the mornings, but heavily muffled. It could still be better but subject to our very tolerant neighbours remaining heppy with the noise level, I think it might be good enough. I’ll keep chasing improvements though!

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